Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Day 4.044: ...makes seventeen

Exile #4 produced these pictures at school last week during their preparation for Monday's holiday and this week off school.

Do you know who they are...


and what it has to do with the post title?

9 comments:

  1. hmmm Easy, it's Brad Pitt (with stage beard) on the left and Elton John on the right without his crazy glasses. not sure what seventeen has to do with them.

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  2. Thanks to my recent exposure to Kindergarten, I've learned that 1+16=17 and the president lives in The White House in Washington D.C. which is in Virginia!

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  3. tell the guy on the right his hat is on fire.

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  4. the guy on the left is a negative of Col Sanders. 17 pieces of chicken in a bucket? Little Bo Peep on the right? ;-)

    A

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  5. Geez, people! It's not 1 + 16, it's the other way around ("because addition is commutative, right!") and I had the pleasure of listening to an hour about W. (no not *that* Dubya) Monday on WAMC. He never made the same mistake twice, they said, but most important: after 2 terms, he went home. Most unusual for successful leaders even beyond the 18th century. An aside to end on: it seems to me that Exile #4 should be allowed to substitute a PM or royal of her choice!

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  6. Thanks for all your answers everyone - very entertaining, but no-one got the correct answer:

    Abraham Lincoln was played by Harold 'Hal' Holbrook Jr in the 1970's TV series that bore his name. President Washington in year '0' of his presidency was General Washington. Which leads you to the word "Hal-o-gen". And, as you all know, the halogens are Group 17 (IUPAC) in the Periodic Table.

    I suppose it was a bit subtle. Or perhaps not.

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  7. Hello there - so here we are: another reminder that it's a long time since I went to school and that science really does move on! J has recently been informing us of the existence of Eris (a planet, apparently) and now you're telling me that the periodic table has 17 groups in it, not eight! When did that happen!? N

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  8. 18 actually! IUPAC changed their scheme in 1990 apparently.

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  9. No wonder I failed my chemistry S level in 1991 - I blame the teachers (no really it was actually too hard and I started going out with my future husband the week before the exam!).
    N

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